Sunday, October 22, 2017

Inktober Day #22 - Lee Morrison's/UC's The 3 Es



Counting down until the end of October ... 9 days left until end of Inktober.

Today's picture/drawing is on the anti-knife ROE (rules of engagement) taught by Lee Morrison of Urban Combatives.

If you missed my other posts on Lee Morrison, please check out:


My transcription of the caption as well as some notes below.



From "The Complete Book of Urban Combatives" (2015)
By Lee Morrison
Chapter 14: Counterweapons Training
Pages 145-146



Background
  • Peter Robins and Paul Child formulated the STAB (Strategic Tactics Against Blade) course taught in CODA (Combative Oriental and Defendu Arts).
  • CODA founded in 1993.
  • Lee Morrison credits STAB for most of the knifefighting and counterweapons training he teaches in UC (Urban Combatives).

The Three Es: Escape, Equalize, Eliminate
  1. First choice: If you have the option to Escape, do so.
  2. Second option: Equalize the threat - pick up anything close to use to even the odds ... hit, throw or shield with the equalizer.
  3. Third choice: Eliminate threat - shift into do-or-die mindset. My drawing doesn't include "Eliminate" - that may be a future drawing/picture, but basically you do what you have trained in for the third "E".

Learn to recognize these Pre-Assault Cues! Dan Inosanto teaches as his anti-knife ROE (Rules of Engagement):

  1. Run!
  2. Throw things!
  3. Use things!
  4. Martial Arts -- and expect to get cut.
IMO, STAB's The Three Es is an easy concise way to remember Dan Inosanto's anti-knife ROE. You now have a set of ROE to work under. Now you know, and knowing is half the battle!!

Be aware and stay safe my Friends!



My drawings for Inktober 2017 - drawing at least 1 pic each day in October:


Saturday, October 21, 2017

Inktober Day #21 - Lee Morrison's/Urban Combatives' Body Language Cues




10 days left until the end of October! That means the end of Inktober also! Thank you for joining me in my Sojourn of Septillion Steps for this project of combining drawings for Inktober and researching martial arts/self-defense. Early in my Inktober drawings I had no focus/theme. Then I was going to attend a Terry Trahan knifefighting seminar and I had an "Ah ha!" moment. Since then, I've been drawing pictures related to knifefighting.

Continuing my research/studies of "tells"/"PINs" (Pre-INcident indicators) today with a picture of some common body language cues taught by Lee Morrison of Urban Combatives.

If you missed my other posts on Pre-Assault Cues with regard to knifefighting, please check out:


Alrighty, here we go!



From "The Complete Book of Urban Combatives" (2015)
By Lee Morrison
Chapter 14:  Counterweapons Training
Pages 142-144

  • Always assume aggressor is armed and scan his hands. Can you see both hands and all fingers?
  • Approached by aggressor with distracting dialogue
  • Adrenal reactions tells:
    • erratic eye movement,
    • pale face,
    • wide-open eyes,
    • or trembling hand



Lee Morrison mentioned "distracting dialogue" above. One of the best writeups I've seen is from Geoff Thompson. He teaches it as"The Four D's" in Chapter 1 of his "Dead or Alive" book:

The Four 'D's

There are four techniques often used by attackers, especially muggers and rapists, in preparing victims for attack. Although these are nearly always overlooked by self-defence writers, the four 'D's – dialogue, deception, distraction and destruction – are the most important element of self-protection to be aware of.

DIALOGUE

Dialogue designed to disarm and distract the targeted victim is the professional attacker's most common priming technique. An attacker will approach a potential victim in a non-threatening way and begin a conversation. Often, he will ask a question about directions, ask if you have the time, a light, or any spare change. His objective is to make you think about his question, so that you do not notice the weapon he is drawing or his accomplice coming round behind you. It only takes a second of distraction for you to get into deep trouble. Understanding this will make you more aware and keep you alert, which is the most important part of target hardening.

DECEPTION

An attacker uses deception to make himself appear harmless. Dialogue and appearance are the most common methods used to deceive victims, to make them let down their guard. Do not expect dangerous people to stand out in a crowd.

Attacks may start with politeness, even with an ingratiating approach. Deception is the attacker's greatest asset. Every attack I have ever documented that was not a blind-side attack (the ones that happen when you do not use awareness) came through deception, the attacker using this as a window of opportunity.

DISTRACTION

Distraction is a part of deception and usually comes through dialogue. The attacker may ask his victim a question and then initiate attack while the victim is thinking about the answer. This distraction also switches off any instinctive, spontaneous physical response the victim may have. A man with twenty years of physical training in a fighting art can be stripped of his ability by this simple ploy. I have witnessed many trained fighters, who are monsters in the controlled arena, get beaten by a guy with only an ounce of their physical ability. How? They were distracted before the attack. Rob, a hardened street fighter and nightclub doorman, always told potential opponents that he didn't want to fight before he attacked them. Their first thought when recovering consciousness would be: 'I'm sure he said he didn't want to fight!'

If the distraction is submissive, 'I don't want any trouble, can we talk about it?' it will also take your assailant down from a state of fight or flight to one of low awareness, because your submissiveness tells him that the danger is over and he can relax into self-congratulation.

Brain engagement, via disarming/distracting dialogue, gives the victim a blind second. This is when the assailant strikes. The distraction is also used by the experienced attacker to take down any protective fences that may have been constructed by the victim (the 'fence' is dealt with in detail in a later chapter).

DESTRUCTION

This is the final product of expert priming. Few people survive the first physical blow and most are out of the game before they even realise that they are in it. Even trained martial artists often get suckered by the four 'D's because these do not appear on their training curriculum. They do not understand the enemy they are facing. The attacker uses the techniques of deception and distraction to prime a victim that is only trained in 'physical response'.


Learn to recognize these Pre-Assault Cues! Now you know, and knowing is half the battle!!

Stay safe my Friends!



My drawings for Inktober 2017 - drawing at least 1 pic each day in October:


Friday, October 20, 2017

Inktober Day #20 - Richard Ryan's Tactical Concealment/Deceptive Carry Methods


Following up on yesterday's picture/post...



  • Inktober Day #19 - Beware the hidden knife! 


  • ...today's picture for Inktober Day #20 is from Richard Ryan's book. In case you missed my previous entry from his book, you can find it here:



  • Inktober Day #7 - Richard Ryan's/DCM's Knifefighting Stance




  • From "Master of the Blade" (1999)
    by Richard Ryan, pages 142-143



      "Cross Hand Method"

    1. Clasp blade in any grip and hid behind the arm. Stay relaxed and look casual.
    2. Bring defensive hand high and to central line with each drawing action. Protects upper body and ensure you don't cut yourself when drawing.
    3. Use simplest and most direct path to target.


    4. "Palming"


    5. Palming - place weapon in one hand and hide it with that hand or against the forearm or leg.
    6. Make the position look natural. Use a mirror to practice. Element of surprise if you look natural.




    Monitor the hands! Even if you can see the hand like in the cross hand method or palming, they can still be hiding a blade. Maintain a reactionary gap.

    Stay aware and safe my Friends!



    My drawings for Inktober 2017 - drawing at least 1 pic each day in October:


    Thursday, October 19, 2017

    The Four Basic Truths of Violent Assault by Rory A Miller



    Posting a short piece written by Rory Miller that is from the fuller Chapter 3 of "Meditations on Violence" on pages 54-57.




    The Four Basic Truths of Violent Assault
    by Rory A Miller


    As a corrections officer, I am often thrust into sudden violent situations. On one particular occasion, I responded to an incident between two inmates.

    One was brushing his teeth. The other came up behind him and struck him on the right side of his head. The tooth brusher tried to turn but was pressed into a corner, punched again and again with hard rights until he curled into a fetal ball. Blood splashed (not smeared) onto the wall at shoulder height.

    Do you train for this? Do you respect the power of a sudden attack and a constant barrage?

    The attacker broke several bones in his hand and did not know it. He didn’t break just the metacarpals of a boxer’s fracture, but also one of his fingers was deformed. He did not know it and just kept hitting. He started complaining of the pain several hours later.

    Do you ever teach that pain alone will stop a committed attacker, that if you break a bone, it’s over?

    I told the attacker that he was lucky. If the other guy had fallen or hit his head on the wall and suffered more serious injury, he could be looking at some heavier charges. He said, “Nah, I held his head with my other hand so it wouldn’t hit the wall. I know how you guys trump up charges and if I’d let him hit the wall you’d try to get me for attempted murder.”

    Do you and your students realize how rational, how planned, a sudden assault can be? It’s only sudden for the defender. Far too often “sudden” is part of his plan. Do you understand that there is a sub-group of human beings who can savagely beat another human being while coolly thinking of their eventual court case?

    The Four Basic Truths

    Assaults happen closer, faster, more suddenly and with more power than most people can understand.

    Closer: Most self-defense drills are practiced at an optimum distance where the attacker must take at least a half step to contact. This gives techniques like blocks enough time to have an effect. You rarely have this time or this distance in a real assault. Give some thought to how your technique will work if there is no room to turn or step. Remember that the attacker always chooses the range and the location, and will pick a place and position that hampers your movements.

    Faster: When your martial arts students are sparring, use a stop watch and time how many blows are thrown in a minute. Even in professional boxing, the number is not that impressive. Then time how many times you can hit a heavy bag in a second. Six to eight times a second is reasonable for a decent martial artist. An assault is more like that. Because the attacker has chosen a time when the victim is off-guard, he can attack all-out with no thought of defense. A competent martial artist who is used to the more cautious timing of sparring is completely unprepared for this kind of speed. You can strike ten times a second. You can’t block ten times a second.

    More suddenly: An assault is based on the attacker’s assessment of his chances. If he can’t get surprise, he often won’t attack. Some experts will say that there is always some intuitive warning. Possibly, but if the warning was noted and heeded, the attack would have been prevented. When the attack happens, it is always a surprise.

    More power: There is a built-in problem with all training. You want to recycle your partners. If you or your students hit as hard as they can every time they hit, you will quickly run out of students. The average criminal does not hit as hard as a good boxer or karateka can, but they do hit harder than the average boxer or karateka usually does because of gloves and dojo etiquette. More often than not, the first strike in an ambush will find its target. Fighting with a concussion is much different than sparring.

    Responses to the Four Basic Truths

    There are specific ways to train to deal with these truths about assault. You must get used to working from a position of disadvantage. Put yourself and your students in the worst positions you can (face down, under a bench, blindfolded to simulate blood in the eyes and with an arm tied in their belt) and start the training from there. No do-overs. Work from the position you find yourself in. There is no “right” move anyway, just moves that worked or didn’t that one time.

    Contact-response training. Condition (as in operant conditioning) for a quick, effective response to any unexpected aggressive touch. Trained properly, the counter-attack will kick in before the chemical cocktail of stress hormones. This will give you one technique at 100%, and possibly the initiative, to the expected victim. Remember, when you are pumped full of adrenaline, you will loose much of your fine motor coordination, peripheral vision, etc. So you need to have your 100% technique trained to be automatic.

    Train to “flip the switch”. Make your students practice going from friendly, distracted, or any other emotion to full on in an instant. Make them play music, converse, fold clothes, write or pour tea as an armored assailant attacks. The key is that the distraction must be natural and relaxed, not the jerky half-preparation of someone who expects an attack.

    In slow motion training, use realistic time-framing. Do not let them pretend that “Monkey plucks jade lotus and presents to golden Buddha” is one move; do not let them pretend that a spinning kick is just as fast as a jab.

    Get used to being hit, and get used to being touched, especially on the face. For various reasons, face contact between adults is loaded with connotations. Accidental face contact almost always results in both students freezing and can cause an outpouring of emotional sludge. Criminals use this by starting with an open-hand attack to the face (called a “***** slap”) that has paralyzing psychological effects.

    Teach common sensitivity. They must respond to what is happening, not to their expectations or fears. If there are weapons mounted on the walls of your dojo and you are practicing self-defense someone should be reaching for the weapons or running for the door.

    Forbid giving up. Winning is a habit. Fighting is a habit. Put them in positions where they are completely immobilized and helpless and set the expectation to keep fighting.

    The Flaw in the Drill

    In the end, a martial artist is training to injure, cripple or kill another human being. However, in the dojo we cannot go about breaking our students So in any drill where students are not regularly hospitalized there is a DELIBERATE flaw, a deliberate break from the needs of reality introduced in the name of safety. In every drill you teach, you must consciously know what the flaw is and make your students aware of it.


    Rory A Miller



    NOTE: I highly recommend all of Rory Miller's books!

    Inktober Day #19 - Beware the hidden knife!



    Day 19 of Inktober - so far, I'm having fun reading/re-reading some of my knifefighting/martial arts/self-defense books. I'm also having fun practicing my 'gesture drawing' also. My drawings are not perfect, but they serve its purpose for me. Like a mental bookmark ... some loose and fast drawings to jog my memory ... like humming a few bars of a song. And on that front, they are perfect for me. Know what I mean?

    Today's picture/topic is the hidden knife. I hope you all are finding my drawings and notes useful in your martial journey!



    
    From "Knives, Knife Fighting and Related Hassles" (1990)
    By Marc "Animal" MacYoung


    "Pissed off Stance"

    • You can't see the knife until he strikes
    • Crossing arms is a natural reaction when someone is pissed off.
    • If someone crosses their arms - call them on it, run, or pre-emptive strike


    "Subway Pass"

    1. Subject approaches with hands in pockets.
    2. He starts to spin. Knife being removed from pocket and is concealed from victim's views.
    3. Completion of spin - knife is out and subject stabs victim.



    MY NOTES/COMMENTS



    "All warfare is based on deception."
    ~Sun Tzu


    Do you know why Police Officers always say, "Let me see your hands!" or advice when interacting with police is to show your hands clearly? If not, please read on...

    Anyone with a knife looking to assault you will conceal their blade. This is not like the movies where the subject will brandish a knife to intimidate. As you can see from my picture above, sometimes the hands are in sight, yet, they can still hide a blade.

    Be aware! Learn to read the tell-tale signs of impending violence. In poker, the signs to look for to see if a player is bluffing are called 'tells'. Gavin deBecker calls them PINs (Pre-INcident indicators).

    The subject will engage in conversation with dialogue as distraction and deception to "close the gap". Once they are close enough, the destruction will go down. Geoff Thompson calls these "The Four D's" in Chapter 1 of his "Dead or Alive" book:

    The Four 'D's

    There are four techniques often used by attackers, especially muggers and rapists, in preparing victims for attack. Although these are nearly always overlooked by self-defence writers, the four 'D's – dialogue, deception, distraction and destruction – are the most important element of self-protection to be aware of.

    DIALOGUE

    Dialogue designed to disarm and distract the targeted victim is the professional attacker's most common priming technique. An attacker will approach a potential victim in a non-threatening way and begin a conversation. Often, he will ask a question about directions, ask if you have the time, a light, or any spare change. His objective is to make you think about his question, so that you do not notice the weapon he is drawing or his accomplice coming round behind you. It only takes a second of distraction for you to get into deep trouble. Understanding this will make you more aware and keep you alert, which is the most important part of target hardening.

    DECEPTION

    An attacker uses deception to make himself appear harmless. Dialogue and appearance are the most common methods used to deceive victims, to make them let down their guard. Do not expect dangerous people to stand out in a crowd.

    Attacks may start with politeness, even with an ingratiating approach. Deception is the attacker's greatest asset. Every attack I have ever documented that was not a blind-side attack (the ones that happen when you do not use awareness) came through deception, the attacker using this as a window of opportunity.

    DISTRACTION

    Distraction is a part of deception and usually comes through dialogue. The attacker may ask his victim a question and then initiate attack while the victim is thinking about the answer. This distraction also switches off any instinctive, spontaneous physical response the victim may have. A man with twenty years of physical training in a fighting art can be stripped of his ability by this simple ploy. I have witnessed many trained fighters, who are monsters in the controlled arena, get beaten by a guy with only an ounce of their physical ability. How? They were distracted before the attack. Rob, a hardened street fighter and nightclub doorman, always told potential opponents that he didn't want to fight before he attacked them. Their first thought when recovering consciousness would be: 'I'm sure he said he didn't want to fight!'

    If the distraction is submissive, 'I don't want any trouble, can we talk about it?' it will also take your assailant down from a state of fight or flight to one of low awareness, because your submissiveness tells him that the danger is over and he can relax into self-congratulation.

    Brain engagement, via disarming/distracting dialogue, gives the victim a blind second. This is when the assailant strikes. The distraction is also used by the experienced attacker to take down any protective fences that may have been constructed by the victim (the 'fence' is dealt with in detail in a later chapter).

    DESTRUCTION

    This is the final product of expert priming. Few people survive the first physical blow and most are out of the game before they even realise that they are in it. Even trained martial artists often get suckered by the four 'D's because these do not appear on their training curriculum. They do not understand the enemy they are facing. The attacker uses the techniques of deception and distraction to prime a victim that is only trained in 'physical response'.

    When the destruction happens, most people have no idea how brutal and quick it can be.

    Rory Miller teaches "The Four Basic Truths":

    "Assaults happen closer, faster, more suddenly and with more power than most people can understand."

    Do not let 'unknown contacts' get close to you. Maintain some reactionary gap... put up your 'Fence' if you have to ... establish your boundaries. Be ready to run if you can or pre-emptive strike if the need arises.

    Craig Douglas aka "Southnarc" in teaching the Criminal Assault Paradigm has narrowed the tell-tale signs down to four Pre-Assault cues:

    1. Grooming
    2. Target Glancing
    3. Discernible Weight Shift
    4. Furtive movement of the hand towards the waist

    For further information, please read:


    Further, keep in mind, this is not the movies, when a knife is deployed, it's deadly force. Kelly McCann, writing as Jim Glover, in Guns & Ammo, May 1995:

    "Any time sharpened steel meets flesh, flesh loses. Once the fury of flashing steel begins, it is almost impossible to stop without sustaining injury. That is the reality of a knife attack. That is what makes a knife so dangerous to fight against."


    And if for whatever reason, you are able to see that the subject approaching you has a blade, keep in mind what martial arts living legend Dan Inosanto teaches as his anti-knife ROE (Rules of Engagement):

    1. Run!
    2. Throw things!
    3. Use things!
    4. Martial Arts -- and expect to get cut.
    Once you cannot see an unknown contact's hands and they are approaching you, usually joking, laughing and smiling, be mindful of what these signs can mean! One sign may be nothing, two signs and your spider-senses should be tingling mildly, three or more signs and you should be like Robby the Robot in the classic sci-fi TV series, "Lost in Space":  "Danger, Will Robinson!" THE FIT WILL HIT THE SHAN!!!

    Now you know why Police Officers always say, "Let me see your hands!"





    My drawings for Inktober 2017 - drawing at least 1 pic each day in October:


    Wednesday, October 18, 2017

    Inktober Day #18 - Dwight McLemore's/American Fighting Congress' "Window of Combat"




    Continuing my research into knifefighting and combining it with drawing a picture a day, here is Day 18th's drawing. The focus today is on Dwight McLemore's/American Fighting Congress' "Window of Combat" which is like the Box Theory of my 2 previous pictures. In case you missed them:




    From "Bowie and Big-Knife Fighting System" (2003)
    By Dwight C. McLemore
    Pages 89-90


    2ND PICTURE CAPTION

    Application of window of combat - principle of inside and outside the box. Both fighters are inside the box.

    NOTES

    • Cocncept as taught from W. Hock Hochheim's American Fighting Congress
    • Imaginary rectangles bounded by shoulders and hips.
    • Some Renaissance masters of defense defined this concept as a circle of opponent's vulnerable points.
    • On the dark side, the area is from which opponent can fire both accurate thrusts and cuts at you.
    • When inside the box or window, be aware that you have to 'deal with the steel' by parry or feint to obtain an attack opening inside the window.


    P.S. Props to my friend 'casteel' for the reminder of W. Hock Hochheim's/Col. Dwight McLemore/American Fighting Congress' "Window of Combat" when I posted the Inktober Day #16- "Box Theory" by Terry Trahan sketch I drew.

    DIGRESSION:  I highly recommend all of Col. Dwight McLemore's books - love them all! And with Paladin Press shutting down their business towards the end of November, you can buy them at 55% off if there is inventory left.




    My drawings for Inktober 2017 - drawing at least 1 pic each day in October:


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